01 October 2015

Journalism for Peace

What is quality journalism and how does it support peace?



The difference between quality journalism and the lesser sort is that the latter is not devoted to supporting peaceful societies or peaceful relationships.

Leading to peace?
I am often expected to present my opinions on the matter of peace in accordance with the sartorial suggestions of Charles Frederick Worth, as well as the sociological suggestions of Louis Wirth.  Yet I am a personage with an enlightened mind of my own.  I therefore have the ability to dress myself in an entirely elegant style of my own even whilst addressing societal problems in a style unlike anything usually expected of and by ordinary mortals.

There are many concerns expressed, here in my salon for world peace, whenever the media has an unpleasant influence on societal relationships.  Fortunately, there are many enlightening pursuits through which to support not only excellence in journalism but also such wonderful experiences as peace, justice, beauty, understanding and magnificence.

News or promotion?
Examinations of the freedom of the media, and especially journalism, rarely take quality into consideration.  That is most concerning.  I have done my best to remedy the situation satisfactorily though I continue to require your assistance, dear guest.

My own investigations have revealed that the lesser sort of media does not truly have any properly defined and refined journalism at all.  That media has an intrusive and dramatic approach to gathering details likely to attract the attention of prurient minds.

At the same time, there are many sources of essential information of urgent significance towards improving the quality of lives yet that information is rarely brought to the adequate and useful attention of ordinary members of the public.  That is why I have taken it upon myself to provide that service.

Power dressing?
Sales of armaments, for example, are often given precedence over the prevention of cruelty by governments, regardless of the damage and distress those armaments are likely to inflict.  Armaments, and other objects used as weapons, often find their way into the hands of immature, emotionally incompetent and socially obnoxious young male persons, most of whom have little concern for anything except their own gratification.  They have certainly not received the socialisation required for civilised respectfulness.

Australia is one of the largest importers of armaments in the world.  At the same time, the country has relied on exports of raw materials, especially from mining, to pay for those potentially deadly devices.  The mines have consequentially destroyed many habitats, and even other livelihoods, around Australia.

Remediation of Australia's 50,000 abandoned mine sites has been grossly inadequate.  It is, therefore, a sign that society itself is frequently abandoned to the whims of exploiters.

Celebrity fashion?
There are many persons who only seek riches for themselves, often assisted by colluding politicians.  The tobacco industry, the asbestos industry, the coal industry, the nuclear industry, the armaments industry and the prurience industry have often abandoned the health of societies for their own purposes.

There is, in addition, a worldwide entertainment industry feeding off the attention likely to be attracted to scenes of human turmoil.  Whether the turmoil is societal or more personal, those emotive and dramatic events, whether factual or fictional, bring excitement to the dull routines and meaningless desperation most people consider to be their normal lot in life.  Lower forms of "journalism" are no more than sordid entertainment.

Religion is a common response to meaningless desperation and dull routines.  Yet unjustifiable religion feeds off hatred for views unlike those of its adherents.  Throughout history, unjustifiable religion has demonstrated disrespect for the diversity often to be found through informed opinions and personally meaningful yet non-religious experiences.

Tabloid journalism is a form of unjustifiable religion in itself.  It claims to share knowledge for the benefit of societies.  It claims it has the moral right to express its views.  Yet it wraps anything of importance under layers of garbage.

Quality journalism is like quality literature.  In fact, it can often be quality literature.  Yet seriousness can often be boring, no matter how meaningful its contents may be considered.

Through my duties, not only as a head of state and media proprietor but also as the chief executive officer of one of the world's most highly regarded educational institutions, I am required to supervise the compilation of training manuals.


Journalism for Peace 

A Manual to Guide Quality



PART A


Section one
Knowing when something is no joke




Section two
Expressing creativity




Section three
Remembering history




Section four
Sharing responsibly




Section five
Interacting reasonably





Section six
Reporting accurately






PART B


Section one
Asking questions thoughtfully





Section two
Showing respect





Section three
Identifying rare beauty





Section four
Encouraging people to form their own conclusions




Section five
Stating the facts clearly and accurately



Section six
Attracting the most influential audience





PART C


Section one
Maintaining clear priorities




Section two
Improving photojournalism




Section three
Preventing overwork




Section four
Focusing on usefulness





Section five
Understanding elections




Section six
Choosing who to interview




PART D


Section one
Examining economic issues




Section two
Being appropriately inclusive




Section three
Selecting colour pieces



Section four
Interpreting law enforcement




Section five
Ensuring the correct pronunciation



Section six
Overcoming prejudices






PART E


Section one
Identifying trends




Section two
Attempting accurate translations




Section three
Handling protests





Section four
Avoiding association with criminals




Section five
Keeping it relevant




Section six
Shaping political decisions




PART F



Section one
Investigating educational matters



Section two
Shaping social values




Section three
Managing the issues



Section four
Examining real estate markets




Section five
Maintaining balanced reports




Section six
Identifying similar incidences




PART G


Section one
Distinguishing between a news report and a training manual




Section two
Trying not to cause offence




Section three
Becoming a rock star journalist



Section four
Dealing with mobs




Section five
Noticing revolutionaries




Section six
Listening to informed critics



PART H


Section one
Maintaining integrity



Section two
Preventing violence




Section three
Checking sources




Section four
Covering big events




Section five
Finding signs of absurdity




Section six
Preventing catastrophes