Friday, July 28, 2017

News from the Adelaide Adagia Ensemble

As it is now noon on the last Friday of the month, the Adelaide Adagia ensemble has assembled here in this serene, ethereal salon to present the latest news. 




To begin, however, here is a brief summary of recent events of much local significance:


































And a few more things...
















And a few more items of recent history...













































There are many things for relatively enlightened beings to think about...

























































Now that the preliminaries are out of the way, several members of the aforementioned ensemble are now on hand with the essential details of today's news.  But should they reveal that news to ordinary mortals?

To answer that question, a panel of distinguished ethereal guest has just assembled alongside the ensemble.  Here is a sampling of the guests' earlier points of view on similar subjects:


Mr van Beethoven:
"There ought to be but one large art warehouse in the world, to which the artist could carry his art-works, and from which he could carry away whatever he needed. As it is, one must be half a tradesman."

Queen Adelaide:
"Villa Twaklinilkawt is that dignified digital location, as you know only too well Ludwig.  Did you use the tradesperson's entrance to arrive here today or did you enter through the stage door as usual?"

(Her Majesty and the irascible composer then argued loudly in German for a few moments, before being stopped by two electronic fluffy objects.)

Mr Mozart:
"The Adelaideans and other South Australians have already heard more than enough bickering.  The aggressively inane arguments expressed by the Lobbyrule narcissists and the Laybore nuisances often prevent harmoniously nuanced policies from being performed with musical finesse."  
 
Mr van Beethoven:
"Music is like a dream. One that I cannot hear." 

Queen Adelaide:
"Good policies are often dreams.  Bad policies are rarely only nightmares: They are an unpleasant reality, much like bad music."

Mr van Beethoven:
"Music is a higher revelation than all wisdom and philosophy."

Mr Mozart:
"You are obviously referring to my music.  You have been unable to hear any more recent stuff.  No wise person would wish to listen to it."

Queen Adelaide:
"The same applies to more recent political players than myself.  They have all been dreadfully cacophonous."

Mr Mozart:
"Music and politics have much in common, though music is more of a mediator."

Mr Beethoven:
"Music is indeed the mediator between the spiritual and sensual life."

Colonel Light:
"If I could say a few words... or play you a tune... or paint you a picture of a future enlightened society... or even map one out... or survey one quite practically..."

Mr Beethoven:
"Art! Who comprehends her? With whom can one consult concerning this great goddess?"

Queen Adelaide:
"Do ensure you read invitations carefully, Ludwig."

Mr Mozart:
Every enlightened being knows that Twaklin is that great goddess, even though Her Illustrious Highness is merely known to the world as an ethereal grand duchess."

Colonel Light:
"Yes, indeed. Her Illustrious Highness assisted me considerably in my surveying duties in South Australia."

Mr Mozart:
"The same applies to my survey of the compositional landscape."

Queen Adelaide:
"My ability to cope with the demands of my duties as the wife of Silly Billy was greatly assisted by the enlightened advice I received from my dear friend, Twaklin."

Mr van Beethoven:
"I still do not understand why metropolitan Adelaide today politically conveys a similar tone to my tune."

Colonel Light:
"The reasons that led me to fix Adelaide where it is I do not expect to be generally understood or calmly judged of at present. My enemies however, by disputing their validity in every particular, have done me the good service of fixing the whole of the responsibility upon me. I am perfectly willing to bear it, and I leave it to posterity and not to them, to decide whether I am entitled to praise or to blame."

Queen Adelaide:
"It is better to ignore most Australian politicians, particularly federal ones."

Mr Mozart:
"The Mozarty Party is still seeking suitably enlightened candidates for the next South Australian state election.  Unfortunately, none could be found for recent federal purposes.  What should we do?"

Mr van Beethoven:
"Do not merely practice your art, but force your way into its secrets; it deserves that, for only art and science can exalt man to divinity."

Mrs Thomas:
"Hello everyone.  I'm Mary.  Sorry I'm late.  I went to the natural common room first but there were no ordinary mortals there.  What's happening?  I am a journalist.  I have a right to know."

Queen Adelaide:
"The natural common room is currently closed to ordinary mortals, as is the annex, the library, the service wing, the guest wing, the parlour, the grand hallway, and many of the archives, too."

Mr Mozart:
"Even the music room has been shut for a considerable time now, except for secret rehearsals."

Colonel Light
"The small reception room leading to the boudoir is also locked, as are many of the gates leading to the walled gardens."

Mr van Beethoven:
"I had a walk through the public domain on my way here.  That is certainly still open though I am not quite sure about the copyright grounds."

Mr Mozart:
"The ethereal theatre is occasionally open, as is this dining room, of course."

Queen Adelaide:
"I think most of us have almost finished breakfast now.  Please remember that we are all expected in the drawing room at noon tomorrow."

Mr Mozart:
"I have the keys to a few of the arts laboratories and science studios of Villa Twaklinilkawt.  There is much research for us all to do today."

Colonel Light:
"Good research always requires insightful observations, especially when there are clouds over the Adelaide Hills."


Mr van Beethoven:
"It is a pity such observations are beyond the awareness of most political candidates, at any level of government.  During the battle for the ballot box, they bang their big advertising drums yet they remain behind the times.  They are often mortified when I notice their mistakes.  There is no reliance to be placed on such candidates.  They do not have the courage to act wisely at the right moment."

Mrs Thomas:
"Well, I am sure it is necessary for all news editors to consider the differences between symbols and cymbals very carefully indeed when there are to be democratic elections."

Colonel Light:
"There are usually plenty of clashes occurring during all sorts of planning meetings."

Mr van Beethoven:
"One clashes with stupidity of all kinds. And then how much money must be spent in advance! The way in which artists are treated is really scandalous. I am compelled to give a third of my receipts to the manager of the theatre and a fifth to the hospitals. Devil take them! As long as these abuses exist, I shall always ask whether music is or is not an art that may be freely exercised. Believe me, there is nothing to be done for artists in times like these."

Queen Adelaide:
"All sorts of theatres must be properly maintained, both physically and artistically.  The ones in hospitals, particularly. must be both beautiful and affordable."

Mr Mozart:
"I have been exploring the new Royal Adelaide Hospital.  From the costs involved during construction, I expected the wards to look as if they belong in Schönbrunn."

Colonel Light:
"And the lack of comfortably affordable housing is just as much of a problem today in Adelaide as it was in 1837."

Mrs Thomas:
"Though you have long had a publicly-funded salary, dear Colonel.  I have long been in the media business.  Providing the public with the news an enlightened society needs is a costly enterprise."

Mr Mozart:
"It has long been difficult for a good musician to make ends meet, too."

Queen Adelaide:
"I do believe we should all collaborate, as usual, in presenting the people of South Australia with euphonious news of the most enlightening kind."


Mr Mozart:
"I am certainly a multi-skilled individual.  I can now express myself reasonably well through a digital keyboard, even from my dressing room.  I can also improvise good policy composition, anytime, anywhere, like a true political virtuoso."


Mr van Beethoven:
"It is a recognised fact that the greatest composers were, like you Mr Mozart, the greatest virtuosos; but did they play like the pianists of the present day, who run up and down the keyboard with passages studied beforehand? Pooh! pooh! pooh! Don't tell me! A real virtuoso, when extemporising, plays pieces which hold together and possess a form. Were the ideas in them fixed instantly on paper, they would be taken for pieces written at leisure. That is what I call playing the piano; everything else is a bad joke."

Mrs Thomas:
"Politicians and journalists in the 21st century should also perform more coherently than they usually do."

Colonel Light:
"Governor Hindmarsh was something of a bad joke, if you ask me, just like some of the so-called musicians who attempt to perform in the pub named after him."

Queen Adelaide:
"I do hope our forthcoming panel discussion will be rather more coherent than this conversation."

King William:
"Dear wife, Why did you not wake me up earlier?  I have been snoozing in the auditorium, very near to the world stage, awaiting news of important upcoming public occasions."

Queen Adelaide:
"You were meant to be helping in the box office, William.  There are usually at least a few respectable patrons seeking good service there."

King William:
"But I want to play on the world stage.  I have been practicing with my trumpet but no-one will allow me to audition."

Mr Mozart:
"If you play like Joe King or his mother, Empress Aria, you will expect flattery and not the opinions of informed critics."

Mrs Thomas:
 "And the media will take no notice one way or the other, unless you become a YouTube sensation and reality tv star."

Mr van Beethoven:
"The world is a king, and like a king, desires flattery in return for favor; but true art is selfish and perverse — it will not submit to the mold of flattery."

Colonel Light:
"But is it selfish and perverse to desire well-designed urban environments for the benefit of current and future generations?"

Mrs Thomas:
"Speculative urban in-fill has allowed selfish property developers to act like unconstitutional kings, much like the directors of mining companies and the banks.  Not much has changed since the 1840s, if you ask me."

Queen Adelaide:
"Like most people in the world, many South Australians have enough problems to contend with, struggling with the day-to-day challenges of traffic congestion, nasal congestion, indigestion, new inventions, dubious intentions, fragmentary educations and exhausted supplies of energy."

Mr van Beethoven:
"The day-to-day exhausted me!"

Mr Mozart:
"Life is just as much a comedy as a tragedy, though comedy usually reigns supreme in Nilkawt rather than in Adelaide.  I plan to go to Nilkawt myself again quite soon. A fellow of mediocre talent will remain a mediocrity, whether he travels or not; but one of superior talent (which without impiety I cannot deny that I possess) will go to seed if he always remains in the same place."

King William:
"I often prefer the company of Adelaideans.  They are usually uncritical of me.  They may even believe I have artistic integrity if not political integrity.  The Nilkawtians are usually better informed, unfortunately."

Mrs Thomas:
"Alas, I have done my best to inform the Adelaideans of their Twaklinesque cultural heritage, to no avail!  They fail to appreciate sprezzatura.  I blame that on News Corp."

Queen Adelaide:
"Please do not upset yourself, dear Mrs Thomas.  Your journalism is far superior and certainly more musical than anything supplied by the gutter press."

Mr Mozart:
"The golden mean, the truth, is no longer recognized or valued. To win applause one must write stuff so simple that a coachman might sing it, or so incomprehensible that it pleases simply because no sensible man can comprehend it."

Colonel Light:
"On surveying the situation, I believe there are currently many remarkably sensible women in South Australia.  They rarely listen to commercial radio stations and they certainly do not display the immaturity of many sporting spectators.  Such ladies spend much time studying important subjects."

Mr van Beethoven:
"Death is the most important subject.  Few have studied it adequately."

Mr Mozart:
"As death, when we come to consider it closely, is the true goal of our existence, I have formed during the last few years such close relationships with this best and truest friend of mankind that death's image is not only no longer terrifying to me, but is indeed very soothing and consoling, and I thank my God for graciously granting me the opportunity...of learning that death is the key which unlocks the door to our true happiness. I never lie down at night without reflecting that —- young as I am — I may not live to see another day. Yet no one of all my acquaintances could say that in company I am morose or disgruntled."

Mrs Thomas:
"You, dear Mr Mozart, have often had quality experiences far ahead of those many persons endure in their miserable, talentless lives.  So many persons have also had more uncomfortable ends than your own untimely demise.  They have been sorely abused financially, physically and psychologically, without the simple pleasures of imaginative creativity."


Queen Adelaide:
"Compassion must always be balanced with respect for the best that life can offer, of course.  Mr Mozart obviously presents the world with much evidence of the highest achievements, Mrs Thomas."

Mr Mozart:
"It is a mistake to think that the practice of my art has become easy to me. I assure you, dear friend, no one has given so much care to the study of composition as I. There is scarcely a famous master in music whose works I have not frequently and diligently studied."

Nannerl Mozart:
"What is that you are saying, dear brother?  How carefully have you studied the works of female musicians?  Now, I thought I would join you from my suite for a while.  I have not yet had breakfast.  For the past few hours I have been diligently studying all sorts of strange policy compositions potentially relating to the future of South Australia."

Mr van Beethoven:
"I have a passionate interest in democratic politics, especially when politicians are enlightened and heroic.  Unfortunately, after they have been elected they usually soon behave like emperors."

Mr Mozart:
"The passions, whether violent or not, should never be so expressed as to reach the point of causing disgust; and music, even in situations of the greatest horror, should never be painful to the ear but should flatter and charm it, and thereby always remain music."

Colonel Light:
"I am afraid the gracious city I planned has been ruined by empire builders."

Mr Mozart:
"All I insist on, and nothing else, is that you should show the whole world that you are not afraid. Be silent, if you choose; but when it is necessary, speak—and speak in such a way that people will remember it."

Nannerl Mozart:
"An enlightened democracy is like beautiful music when no-one is louder, or quieter, than necessary."

King William:
"Perhaps that is why no-one wants to hear me play the trumpet.  I could do a few Trump impressions now, if you like."

Queen Adelaide:
"Do settle down, William.  We have serious matters to discuss."

Mr van Beethoven:
"Applaud, my friends, the comedy is over."

Mrs Thomas:
"And so we must soon consider whether ordinary mortals deserve to receive news from the Adelaide Adagia Ensemble in the hours, days, weeks, months and years ahead.  Is the South Australian public currently willing to support the creation of world peace?"

Mr Mozart:
"As far as I am aware, very few persons in this part of the world form sufficiently attentive audiences unless blasted with amplification."

Mr van Beethoven:
"Not to mention the loud displays of irrelevant fireworks.  Even I can hear those annoyances."

Colonel Light:
"Yet so many South Australians complain about not having enough money for their own daily needs.  They also complain about inadequate local services."

Queen Adelaide:
"I have always encouraged thrift in my namesake city, just as I continue to encourage all households to acquire modest spending habits."

Mrs Thomas:
"Many people will say it is easy for you to say that, Your Majesty.  You have never struggled to run a business, establish a home and maintain a growing family in an unknown climate like I have.  You have never had to persuade the banks to lend you money so that you can thrive and prosper."

King William:
"Adelaide does know what it is like to be a migrant, though.  She also knows what it is like to deal with an unsympathetic and rather insensitive media.

Nannerl Mozart:
"I do believe we should all assist Mrs Thomas and all other quality, investigative journalists, over the coming months, as they perform their undercover work on behalf of a more enlightened democracy in this part of the world."

Mr van Beethoven:
"That is all very well and good to say.  Yet who is willing to pay for the composition of quality news reports?"


King William:
"Royal sponsorship should suffice.  I shall ask all excessively privileged persons to cough up the funds from their overflowing coffers immediately."

Colonel Light:
"That has never worked in the past.  Excessively privileged persons always want too much in return.  And when have they ever supported better democracies?"


Mr Mozart:
"I think everyone should audition.  Not everyone deserves to receive enlightening news.  That is why exclusive access is usually more valued than inclusive access."

Queen Adelaide:
"I was in the foyer of the ethereal theatre yesterday, on my way to assist at the box office, when an ordinary member of the Adelaidean public demanded money from me for an electricity bill.  I thought, at first, that my dear husband, Silly Billy, had been displaying his eccentricities in a compromising situation, as many silly husbands tend to do.  No-one had previously explained to me the difference between the eccentricities of Bill and the properties of electromagnetism in domestic situations.  And I never carry money with me."

Mr Mozart:
"As we are to perform as a panel soon, none of us should therefore behave as soloists.  Yet I was asked by an ordinary member of the Adelaidean public for my opinion on solo panels last week.  Apparently such panels involve energetic open air performances in sunny weather."

Mr van Beethoven:

"I am often asked by ordinary members of the Adelaidean public for my opinions on a wide range of subjects, though I can hardly hear a word of what they say.  I am sure my opinions are sought mainly because I am considered to be a celebrity in this part of the world.  I prefer to express myself through a keyboard."


Colonel Light:

"I have been on several key boards around Adelaide, most usually in search of honest stakeholders to help me survey the political situation better.  Holding stakes steady requires much integrity and courage in unchartered policy territory."

Mrs Thomas:
"The Adelaide Adagia Ensemble has spent many years measuring the levels of honesty, integrity and courage around Adelaide.  Will their efforts only be considered a heritage performance?  


Queen Adelaide:
"Quality news is necessary to ensure a city of dreams becomes an elegant, egalitarian city of peace, prosperity and enlightenment."


Now, the Adelaide Adagia Ensemble seeks your views.  You may even have a few questions for the panel.

Twaklin (AT) gmail . com